• The American West in Film and Television: Weird West

    It wasn’t just outlaws that made the West wild. This program explores the cross-genre, supernatural tales that combined horror with classic westerns. These included “Billy the Kid vs. Dracula,” “Jesse James Meets Frankenstein’s Daughter,” “The Beast of Hollow Mountain,” and genuinely bizarre films like “The Valley of Gwangi” in which a cowboy seeks fame and […]

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  • Taos Tuesdays: John Sloan and the Promotion of Native American Art

    In the summer of 1918, John Sloan became enchanted with the Southwest while spending several months in Santa Fe. For the next thirty years he depicted the New Mexico landscape and at times Hispanic and American Indian peoples in his paintings. During this time Sloan also became a champion for American Indian watercolors. As early […]

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  • On the Wrong Side of Allen Street: Businesswomen in Tombstone, 1879-1884

    This program by Arizona State University history professor Heidi Osselaer, Ph.D. challenges the perception of women in territorial Arizona. In the late 1800s, women came to Tombstone hoping to cash in on the silver boom. Many women were forced to work after being widowed, divorced or abandoned. Others chose to remain single and financially independent […]

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  • Artist Spotlight: George Hallmark

    Artist George Hallmark’s creative career has spanned nearly five decades, progressing from draftsman to commercial artist to renowned oil painter. His subject matter is primarily architectural, focusing on the types of structures most often found in Mexico or along the California coast. Known for his precise architectural realism, he gives each of his compositions of […]

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  • The Real Story: “True Grit”

    Perhaps no Hollywood western film captured the realities of the dangerous frontier better than the Coen brothers’ “True Grit,” based on the book by Charles Portis. This film presentation about a violent and unforgiving time in America’s history is provided courtesy of Smithsonian Channel. Included with museum admission; free to museum members.

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  • Working Ranch Wear: Tools of the Trade

    Cowboy style has influenced popular fashion throughout the decades, but in its truest form it was created as a practical way to ensure survival. This program, presented by the Cowgirls Historical Foundation, examines the origins of ranch wear such as hats, boots, chaps and accessories, and the functionality of each piece worn by working cowboys […]

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  • Ranching on the High Desert: Five Generations, One Family

    Decades before mining and gambling came to define Nevada’s commercial success, its largest industry was ranching. The discovery of the Comstock Lode (1859) flooded the state with newcomers seeking their fortune in silver, and increased the need for food suppliers, as did the Homestead Act of 1862, which granted individuals the right to claim public […]

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  • “America’s Yellowstone”

    Encompassing more than 2 million acres, America’s oldest and largest national park is part wildlife sanctuary, part geological wonder, and an American treasure. This film presentation is provided courtesy of Smithsonian Channel. Included with museum admission; free to museum members.

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  • “The Taos Society of Artists” Symposium

    This fascinating two-day lecture series, sponsored by Marcia and Hugh Ruddock, examines one of the most highly regarded artist groups in the nation’s history, the Taos Society of Artists. Internationally recognized scholars will discuss the society’s members, artistic technique, the birth of tourism in Taos, the topic of art patronage and the unique components that […]

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  • The American West in Film and Television: B-Western Beauties

    While cowboys were the heroes of many westerns, the heroines also played a vital role. In their TV and film portrayals, these actresses saved people, sang, sighed, shot, skulked and slung hash, and through it all they were expected to look ravishing. They were the ones who often tempered violence by bringing civility, romance and […]

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