• Between You, Me, and the Fencepost

    In this humorous and insightful program, Joe Jeffrey shares his knowledge of what he considers to be one of the most important building blocks that tamed the Old West: fence posts. A self-proclaimed expert on the subject, Jeffrey has spent years collecting photos of some of the most creative and unusual objects ever used to […]

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  • Fighting for Uncle Sam: Buffalo Soldiers in the Frontier Army

    In this program hosted by Shelly Dudley of Guidon Books, author and historian John Langellier, Ph.D. examines the role African American soldiers played in opening the Trans-Mississippi West. Learn how these formerly enslaved men fought for their freedom on Civil War battlefields, carried the “Stars and Stripes” to the Caribbean and pursued Pancho Villa into […]

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  • A Celebration of Scottsdale’s Artistic Origins

      Please join us as we honor the anniversary of the opening of Scottsdale’s Arizona Craftsmen Center (which opened February 24, 1946). From 5-7 p.m., enjoy guest speakers Betsy Fahlman, Ph.D. and Joan Fudala, sample fun flavors of popcorn made locally by My Popcorn Kitchen, and view two exhibitions that showcase Scottsdale’s rich arts heritage: […]

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  • Bringing Characters to Life: Costume Design and Character Development in Film

    Great costume design, like sets and scenery, is a natural extension of the story that provides subtle cues to support the narrative. More than simply transforming an actor into a character, costuming can be used to establish emotional make-up or mood, distinguish social-economic status, convey authority (or lack thereof), contextualize an era, or develop a […]

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  • Hashknife Pony Express Arrival

    Experience living history when the Hashknife Pony Express, the oldest officially sanctioned Pony Express in the world, thunders into town to deliver the mail to U.S. Postal Service representatives at the front steps of Scottsdale’s Museum of the West. After the mail drop at noon, meet the two dozen riders (and horses!) and take part […]

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  • Behind the Lens: Photographers of the American West Featuring Kathy McCraine

    Kathy McCraine’s stunning, authentic images of ranch life evoke the physicality and natural charisma of her subjects, while capturing the beauty of the landscape. In this program, the photographer discusses her life’s work documenting and preserving the heritage of American ranching ‒ particularly cowboy life in Arizona ‒ through her writing, publishing and photography. McCraine […]

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  • Nicole Carson Bonilla: A Cowgirl’s Legacy

    In this program, Nicole Carson Bonilla shares unforgettable photos and video and discusses growing up in a family of western show performers, dating back to her grandfather Buss Carson in the 1930s. Buss, whose peers included famed cowboys Roy Rogers and Gene Autry, toured the United States, Mexico and Canada with his show, which included […]

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  • The American West in Film and Television: Weird West

    It wasn’t just outlaws that made the West wild. This program explores the cross-genre, supernatural tales that combined horror with classic westerns. These included “Billy the Kid vs. Dracula,” “Jesse James Meets Frankenstein’s Daughter,” “The Beast of Hollow Mountain,” and genuinely bizarre films like “The Valley of Gwangi” in which a cowboy seeks fame and […]

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  • Taos Tuesdays: John Sloan and the Promotion of Native American Art

    In the summer of 1918, John Sloan became enchanted with the Southwest while spending several months in Santa Fe. For the next thirty years he depicted the New Mexico landscape and at times Hispanic and American Indian peoples in his paintings. During this time Sloan also became a champion for American Indian watercolors. As early […]

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  • On the Wrong Side of Allen Street: Businesswomen in Tombstone, 1879-1884

    This program by Arizona State University history professor Heidi Osselaer, Ph.D. challenges the perception of women in territorial Arizona. In the late 1800s, women came to Tombstone hoping to cash in on the silver boom. Many women were forced to work after being widowed, divorced or abandoned. Others chose to remain single and financially independent […]

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