• Bucking the Odds: The Art of the Cowgirl

    It wasn’t until the advent of Wild West shows that working cowgirls became widely recognized. In this program, Betsy Fahlman, Ph.D. explores the ways in which cowgirls and their heritage are depicted in art, providing both historic context and insight into life on the frontier. Dr. Fahlman is a professor of art history at Arizona […]

    Continue reading
  • Taos Tuesdays: Three Myths of Cultural Heritage: Tourism Perspectives

    In this presentation, Dallen J. Timothy, Ph.D., professor of community resources/development at Arizona State University, examines the changing perceptions of cultural heritage in the tourism industry. He will discuss the growing recognition and appreciation of the heritage of ordinary people and the important role they play in creating a rich cultural heritage, in addition to […]

    Continue reading
  • Behind the Lens: Photographers of the American West featuring Laura Wilson

    Join Laura Wilson as she discusses how her photography documents the stark realism of small Western communities and the individuals who live there. Wilson’s images have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, GQ Magazine, English Vogue, London’s Sunday Times Magazine, The Washington Post Magazine and Wallpaper. She apprenticed with […]

    Continue reading
  • Rhinestones, Rodeo and Retro Style: Vintage Glamour

    In this program the Cowgirls Historical Foundation showcases its members’ stunning, private collection of vintage clothing from the likes of Rodeo Ben, Nathan Turk (aka “The Tailor to Hollywood”), Nudie Cohn (aka “Nudie the Rodeo Tailor,” “Dior of the Sagebrush,” and “The Original Rhinestone Cowboy”), and Manuel Cuevas. Each of these designers fused the influences […]

    Continue reading
  • Meet the Author: Robert Knott

    Hear from bestselling author Robert Knott, who will give a talk in the theater and sign copies of his newest release, “Robert B. Parker’s Revelation,” which will be available for purchase in the museum store. Knott, who is also an actor and producer, was chosen by the estate of author Robert B. Parker to continue […]

    Continue reading
  • Marshall Trimble: Tombstone’s Social Life (What Folks Did When They Weren’t Gunfighting)

    In its heyday, Tombstone, Arizona was a busy metropolis that boasted hotels, gambling and dance halls, brothels and more than 100 saloons. The Bird Cage Theatre, which still stands today, was billed as the “wildest, wickedest night spot between Basin Street and the Barbary Coast.” Hear from consummate storyteller and Arizona’s Official State Historian Marshall […]

    Continue reading
  • Taos Tuesdays: The Patron/Artist Relationship and the Art of Collecting

    Collectors played an important role in the promotion and support of members of the Taos Society of Artists. Leading American art dealers Brad Richardson (Legacy Gallery) and Jack A. Morris Jr. (Morris & Whiteside Galleries) examine this connection and the cultivation of a new generation of collectors. Included with museum admission; free to museum members.

    Continue reading
  • OK Chorale

    Join Yodeling Al, Jingel’n Jud and Tumbleweed Tony ‒ members of the OK Chorale ‒ for an entertaining program of songs and stories about the Old West. The OK Chorale offers a unique entertainment experience that combines the wonderful harmonies of the traditional cowboy music of the silver screen era with the fascinating history of […]

    Continue reading
  • Ed Mell and Kristin Atwell: Making the Western Opera “Riders of the Purple Sage”

    Hear from world-renowned artist Ed Mell and Emmy award-winning filmmaker/producer Kristin Atwell as they share their process for translating the most popular Western novel of all time − “Riders of the Purple Sage” − into an opera. In this program, Ed Mell, widely known for his graphic style and striking desert landscapes, discusses his creative […]

    Continue reading
  • The American West in Film and Television: Riders of the Purple Sage: The Backstory

    Zane Grey’s “Riders of the Purple Sage,” which has been in print continuously since 1912, is perhaps the most popular western novel of all time. It significantly shaped the formula of westerns with its themes of revenge, love and morality and gave credence to the role of the gunman as anti-hero. The novel spawned no […]

    Continue reading