• The Western Film: Culture and Concept – “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance”

    One of 15 Westerns released in 1962, “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance” was among Director John Ford’s last and most expensive features. It starred John Wayne and James (Jimmy) Stewart in the dark tale of two men bound together by the death of a common enemy whose truth becomes lost in the end. Sometimes […]

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  • The OK Chorale

    Join Yodeling Al, Jingel’n Jud and Tumbleweed Tony ‒ members of the OK Chorale ‒ for an entertaining program of songs and stories about the Old West. The OK Chorale blends comedy, and tales both true and mythical, into a Western musical revue. Included with museum admission; free to museum members.

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  • Frontier Doctors with Marshall Trimble

    In 1880, Tombstone was a town of 2,000 citizens with a dozen doctors, but only four of them had a license to practice. The word “practice” took on new meaning on the frontier as these doctors performed procedures without the restrictions and restraints required of their Eastern colleagues. In those days, doctors treated all manner […]

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  • Susan Folwell, Santa Clara Pueblo Artist

    Susan Folwell is one of today’s most exciting and innovative Pueblo potters. Using processes grounded in conventional clay and firing techniques, she regularly includes symbolism from varied Native American cultures, creating designs that reflect a range of contemporary viewpoints on social and political ideas as well as traditional patterns. Her most recent work involves interpretations […]

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  • The American West in Film and Television: Changing Times, What Happened to TV Westerns?

    During the peak of their popularity, 26 Westerns aired weekly during primetime. By the early 1970s, only “Gunsmoke” and “Bonanza” remained in primetime’s television lineup. The assassinations of Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr., and violent campus protests against the Vietnam War contributed to the mounting pressure on networks to reduce the violence in […]

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  • “Pioneers Turned Millionaires: Levi Strauss” (a Smithsonian Channel film)

    Discover the rags-to-riches story behind Levi Strauss, one the largest and most legendary fashion labels in the world. A courageous and hardworking entrepreneur who left Germany hoping to find a better life in America, Strauss succeeded beyond his wildest dreams, leading the charge during one of the most exciting eras in economic history by changing […]

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  • Museum Members’ Cultural Tour

    Santa Fe Sojourn: April 10-14, 2018 Expand your first-hand knowledge of art through our annual cultural travel program (available to members at the Supporting Member level and above)! This year’s tour takes us to magical New Mexico, where history and culture unite in one of the largest and most important art markets in the country—Santa […]

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  • Behind Barbed Wire: The Art and Culture of the Internment Camps

    Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, enabling the Secretary of War and Military Commanders to designate and restrict access to military areas, effectively authorizing the removal of more than 110,000 Japanese Americans living on the West Coast to a series of remote War Relocation Centers. For […]

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